clock - making time

How many of you find it hard to “make time” for yourselves?   Yes, there is work, the kids’ activities, the grocery shopping, taking the car to the garage, any number of chores that must get done.  Our lives often seem to lack space for us to care of our physical, mental, emotional and spiritual selves.  But it’s important to know or remember that you deserve the same attention you give to others and other things in your life.  How can you turn the tide and create space to care for yourself?  Let’s take a look at this dilema.

Storm King Sculpture

As some of you may know, I love to replicate the shape, form, and energy of sculptures.  This large, strong sculpture at Storm King Sculpture Garden along the Hudson River in New York state caught my eye.  I loved its largeness; its heaviness; its strength; its connection to the earth, to the sky, and the world around it.  And so, of course, I just had to be photographed with it to try and capture its qualities through my posture.  But there was more going on for me than just attempting to capture those qualities . . . .

calendar

The end of the school year is a time of disequilibrium  for teachers, students, and parents.  The weather is warmer and our classrooms often become stuffy and uncomfortable.  Thoughts of summer fun flicker through our students’minds as well as ours making focus and concentration hard for many.  Our students often become more active, difficult to manage, or they become lethargic due to the heat and disinterest.  We teachers often become more revved up with so much to accomplish before the school doors close for the summer, but at the same time, we are wiped-out.  It’s been a long year.  Our once eager learners have all but checked out.  We wish we could check out but can’t.  There’s still work to be done.  How can we handle  our students’ lack of interest in learning?  How can we quiet our and our students’ energies so that we are all more at-ease and  they are more engaged?  Read on for some tips to make the end of the school year easier  for all of us. . . .

dragonsbreath

Dragon Breath is a great way to release the anxieties and worries that may be making it difficult for you or your students/children to function well in your lives.  Join me on this free, audio offering from the “Spotlight” article of me on the Moving Spirit newsletter as I lead you through this releasing, breathing pattern.  Feel the tension dissolve with each breath!

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Peaceful blessings,

Sandy

Sandy_Reflecting

The last sentence of an article I recently read on the Intent Blog written by Debra Moffitt was,”Every action counts.”  For some reason those words have clung to me like a burr that catches hold of your pant leg and travels home with you after a walk through a meadow of tall grasses.  This sentence was the author’s last words in her article discussing what karma is, “the effects of our actions.”  She describes how what we do has an effect on us and on others.  Every actions counts . . . .

Sandyhook_Presentation

I left for Newtown, CT to work with some of the K-6 grade teachers with my props and materials safely packed, my music stored in the pocket of my suitcase, my handouts ready, my flash drive with my presentation safely tucked away in my purse, and my emotions jitter bugging inside me.  Would I really be able to be of some assistance in making the teachers’ stress levels soften?  Would they connect with me, an outsider, and feel that I had something useful for them to use in quieting their emotions? Would they each find one, two, or three relaxation techniques I was prepared to share with them that they could adopt as their own self-care techniques?  A sense of uneasiness filled me as my husband and I started down the road to Newtown on March 13th.  I so wanted to be helpful to them . . . .

 

Providence2

There are times when you are faced with a situation that requires you to do what you have to do.  The recent snowstorm, Nemo, that hit New England, was one of those times for me.  I arrived in Providence, RI on Thursday, February 7th,  the day before the storm was due to hit, knowing full well what was coming our way.  I have endured many a snowstorm living in Illinois and New Hampshire, but this one was coming at the worst possible time.  My daughter was to have a baby shower on  Saturday, February 9th.   If the weather prediction was correct , her shower wouldn’t be on Saturday.  We had to wait and see. . . .

Mom and Dad photo

We’ ve all have heard that we should ‘be in the moment,’ or ‘enjoy each moment to the fullest.’  This advice for living may sound trite, overused, but there is great truth in those words for one never knows when the moments will end.   When three generations of my immediate family gathered in Florida last June  to celebrate my dad’s 90th birthday, I found that I was joyfully living that advice.

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER